subjunctive mode

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 00-2


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

What is a mode?

Every present, past, and future tense has two different yet parallel ways to say the same thing: the indicative way and the subjunctive way. Each way is called a "mode".



BASIC MEANINGINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
he is/doeshablahable
he washablabahablara or hablase
he didhablósee above
he hasha habladohaya hablado
he hadhabía habladohubiera or hubiese hablado
he willhablaráhablare (not commonly used)
he will havehabrá habladohubiere hablado (not commonly used)
BASIC MEANINGINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
he is/doescomecoma
he wascomíacomiera or comiese
he didcomsee above
he hasha comidohaya comido
he hadhabía comidohubiera or hubiese comido
he willcomerácomiere (not commonly used)
he will havehabrá comidohubiere comido (not commonly used)

The conditional (what someone would do or would have done under certain conditions or circumstances) is not the present, the past, or the future, and therefore it is not a verb tense. Traditionally, it is considered its own mode: the conditional mode, and therefore it does not have a parallel subjunctive way to say it.

Despite what you may have heard, the subjunctive forms have the same basic meanings as the indicative forms: for example, "comes" and "comas" both mean "you eat".

The subjunctive forms are primarily used in one sentence that is embedded into another, in other words a sub-sentence, or a "subordinate clause". However, the indicative forms also are used in the subordinate clauses, and the confusion arises when you have figure out which one to use.

There are many clear-cut contexts in which one is correct and the other is not, but there are also many contexts in which both are correct, and the difference in meaning can range from slight to significant.

As an English-speaker learning Spanish, even at quite an advanced level, you should be concerned about (and tested on) the clear-cut contexts. Complicated explanations of the nuanced examples are often mistakenly used to explain the clear-cut examples, when those explanations really don't apply.

Most textbooks in English call this the "subjunctive mood", but it originally was called the "subjunctive mode", meaning the subjunctive way to say the same thing. This mispronunciation mistake took hold in English in the early 1900's, and which propagated many subsequent misunderstandings that erroneously associate some kind of emotional and/or unreal significance with these forms.

In Spanish, Italian, French, Portuguese, German, and Latin, the word "mode" is still used.

While the subordinate clauses are strongly associated with the subjunctive forms, the indicative forms are frequently used in subordinate clauses, too. And in a few cases, the subjunctive forms even find their way into the main clause.

MATCH IT - INDICATIVE WITH CORRESPONDING SUBJUNCTIVE

REGULAR & SOME IRREGULAR

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 00-1


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

What is a subordinate clause?

A subordinate clause is simply a sentence embedded in another sentence. In Spanish, it's called an "oración subordinada" or "oración secundaria", literally a "subordinated sentence" or "secondary sentence".

The 'sentence-in-a-sentence' can act as an adjective, an adverb, or a noun.

as an adjective - which one?

an adjective describing which lady

· That FUNNY lady is my Spanish teacher.

· That lady WHO IS WEARING A SOMBRERO is my Spanish teacher.

as an adverb - when? where? how? how much?

an adverb describing when he runs

· He runs NOW.

· He runs WHEN HE HAS ENOUGH TIME.

an adverb describing where he runs

· He runs HERE.

· He runs WHERE THE PATH IS PAVED.

an adverb describing how he runs

· He runs QUICKLY.

· He runs HOW HIS COACH INSTRUCTED HIM.

an adverb describing how much he runs

· He runs A LOT.

· He runs AS MUCH AS HIS DAD RUNS.

as a noun - what?

a noun as subject of verb

· SOMETHING is foolish.

· THAT HE ISN'T WEARING A COAT is foolish.

· SOMETHING impresses us.

· THAT SHE SPEAKS RUSSIAN SO WELL impresses us.

Note that, in English, if the embedded sentence is the subject, we usually move it to the end, and we have to insert a 'filler' subject in front:

· (IT) is foolish THAT HE ISN'T WEARING A COAT.

· (IT) impresses us THAT SHE SPEAKS RUSSIAN SO WELL.

a noun as object of verb

· The teacher asks SOMETHING.

· The teacher asks THAT WE SIT QUIETLY AND LISTEN.

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 04


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

NOUN PHRASE AS A SUBJECT

OF VERBS LIKE "INTERESTS"


Recall that the subjunctive forms are strongly associated with subordinate clauses, one sentence embedded into another.

A sentence embedded into another sentence can act as the subject:

· SOMETHING interests me.

· THAT YOU WORK IN TECHNOLOGY interests me.

· SOMETHING pleases me.

· THAT MY STUDENTS WRITE WELL pleases me.

Note that, in English, if the embedded sentence is the subject, we usually move it to the end, and we have to insert a 'filler' subject in front:

· (IT) interests me THAT YOU WORK IN TECHNOLOGY.

· (IT) pleases me THAT MY STUDENTS WRITE WELL.

In this kind of sentence in Spanish, the subjunctive mode (i.e., the subjunctive way) is almost always (perhaps always?) used in the subordinate clause (the embedded sentence):

· ALGO me interesa.

· QUE TÚ TRABAJES EN LA TECNOLOGÍA me interesa. (not "trabajas")

· ALGO me impresiona.

· QUE HABLES RUSO me impresiona. (not "hablas")

This is a very subtle change in the verb form, and most native Spanish speakers do it without even realizing it.

Here is a list of 50 verbs like "interests":



aburre bores duele hurts, pains
afecta affects encanta enchants
aflige afflicts enfada, enoja angers, maddens
agobia overwhelms entretiene entertains, amuses
agrada pleases, gratifies espanta frightens, scares
alarma alarms fascina fascinates
alegra gladdens frustra frustrates
alienta encourages gratifica rewards
anima encourages, cheers, enlivens, excites gusta pleases
apasiona empassions hiere hurts, injures
asombra amazes, astonishes, astounds impresiona impresses
asusta scares, frightens inspira inspires
aterroriza terrifies insulta insults
calma calms interesa interests
cansa tires irrita irritates
cautiva captivates lastima hurts, injures
complace pleases, satisfies lesiona hurts, injures
confunde confuses, confounds maravilla amazes, astonishes, astounds
conmueve moves, touches (emotionally) molesta bothers, annoys (not molests)
conviene suits, is convenient motiva motivates
daña harms preocupa preoccupies, worries
deleita delights repugna appalls
desalienta discourages satisface satisfies
desconcierta disconcerts, puzzles, baffles sorprende surprises
disgusta displeases (not disgusts) tranquiliza calms, reassures
dieverte entertains, amuses trastorna upsets, unsettles


Possible exceptions may include verbs of informing and telling:

· SOMETHING informs me about my grades.

· THAT YOU SEND E-MAILS informs me about my grades.

· SOMETHING tells us about her motivation.

· THAT SHE STUDIES A LOT tells us about her motivation.

REGULAR FORMS


SPELL IT - SUBJUNCTIVE!

REGULAR GROUP #1

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - SUBJUNCTIVE!

REGULAR GROUP #2

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

IRREGULAR FORMS


SPELL IT - SUBJUNCTIVE!

IRREGULAR PRACTICE SET #1

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - SUBJUNCTIVE!

IRREGULAR PRACTICE SET #2

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - SUBJUNCTIVE!

IRREGULAR PRACTICE SET #3

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 03


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

NOUN PHRASE AS A SUBJECT OF VERBS LIKE "IS"


Recall that the subjunctive forms are strongly associated with subordinate clauses, one sentence embedded into another.

A sentence embedded into another sentence can act as the subject:

· SOMETHING is typical.

· THAT WE EAT IN THE CAFETERIA is typical.

· SOMETHING sounds interesting.

· THAT YOU ARE VISITING THE MUSEUM doesn't sound interesting.

Note that, in English, if the embedded sentence is the subject, we usually move it to the end, and we have to insert a 'filler' subject in front:

· (IT) is typical THAT WE EAT IN THE CAFETERIA.

· (IT) doesn't sound interesting THAT YOU ARE VISITING THE MUSEUM.

In this kind of sentence in Spanish, the subjunctive way is usually used in the subordinate clause, in other words, in the embedded sentence:

· ALGO es típico.

· QUE COMAMOS EN LA CAFETERÍA es típico. (not "comemos")

· ALGO no suena interesante.

· QUE UDS. VISITEN EL MUSEO no suena interesante. (not "visitan")

This is a very subtle change in the verb form, and most native Spanish speakers do it without even realizing it.

The most common linking verbs are: es/está (is), suena (sounds), parece (appears/looks/seems).

In sentences like these, the basic exceptions are explicit affirmations of truth, certainty, undeniability, and clarity/obviousness:

· ALGO es cierto.

· QUE COMEMOS EN LA CAFETERÍA es cierto. (not "comamos")

Using the actual adjective that asserts truth, certainty, etc. is the key. An assertion may be true, certain, undeniable, etc., and still require the subjunctive:

· Es cierto QUE LOS CUBANOS HABLAN ESPAÑOL.

· Es normal QUE LOS CUBANOS HABLEN ESPAÑOL.

This list of basic exceptions is relatively short, and of course there are more, but not many: cierto, verdadero, correcto, seguro, claro, obvio, evidente, patente (evident, clear), visible, perceptible, real, innegable (undeniable), indiscutible, incuestionable, indudable, inequívoco.

Note that "verdadero" is the adjective "true", and "(la) verdad" is the corresponding noun "(the) truth". They both affirm truth and both require the indicative.

The word "seguro" can mean "sure/definite" and also "safe". If it means "sure/definite", the subordinate clause should use the indicative (since it is an explicit affirmation of truth). But if it means "safe", the subordinate clause should use the subjunctive.

The word "correcto" can mean "correct = true" and also "correct = appropriate". If it expresses "true", the subordinate clause should use the indicative (since it is an explicit affirmation of truth). But if it expresses "appropriate", the subordinate clause should use the subjunctive.

Negation of the truth, certainty, etc., requires the subjunctive:

· ALGO no es evidente.

· QUE TÚ COMPRENDAS no es evidente. (not "comprendes")

Watch out for negative expressions that affirm truth, such as "no es falso" and "no es negable" (negatable = deniable), which affirm truth and certainty. These are actually logical, but also tricky:

· Es falso QUE ESTUDIES CÁLCULO.

· No es falso QUE ESTUDIAS CÁLCULO.

CHOOSE IT - INDICATIVE OR SUBJUNCTIVE?

REGULAR GROUP #1

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

CHOOSE IT - INDICATIVE OR SUBJUNCTIVE?

REGULAR GROUP #2

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

IRREGULAR FORMS


CHOOSE IT - INDICATIVE OR SUBJUNCTIVE?

IRREGULAR GROUP #1

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

CHOOSE IT - INDICATIVE OR SUBJUNCTIVE?

IRREGULAR GROUP #2

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

CHOOSE IT - INDICATIVE OR SUBJUNCTIVE?

IRREGULAR GROUP #3

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 02


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

IRREGULAR FORMS - INTRODUCTION


If one of the indicative present-tense forms is irregular, all the subjunctive present-tense forms are usually irregular in the same way.

These always follow the green pattern.

Because this is such a reliable correspondence, the majority of textbooks mistakenly categorize the subjunctive forms as regular. However, it makes no sense to call a form "regular" if it shares an irregular spelling pattern! Obviously, the irregular forms of the indicative and the subjunctive are irregular in the same way.



SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élsalesalga
ellossalensalgan
salessalgas
yosalgosalga
nosotrossalimossalgamos

However, there are two verbs that have an irregular indicative form that have completely regular subjunctive forms. In other words, you might expect the subjunctive forms to be irregular, but they aren't.

These both follow the blue pattern.

Recall that the subjunctive form of "da" and "doy" is "dé", with a written accent to distinguish it visually from the preposition "de". The other subjunctive forms don't have written accents: "den", "des", and "demos".



SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
éldadé
ellosdanden
dasdes
yodoydé
nosotrosdamosdemos


SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élestáesté
ellosestánestén
estásestés
yoestoyesté
nosotrosestamosestemos

The subjunctive forms of four verbs must simply be memorized:

These all follow the green pattern.



SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élsabesepa
ellossabensepan
sabessepas
yosepa
nosotrossabemossepamos


SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élessea
ellossonsean
eresseas
yosoysea
nosotrossomosseamos


SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élvavaya
ellosvanvayan
vasvayas
yovoyvaya
nosotrosvamosvayamos


SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
impersonalhayhaya
élhahaya
elloshanhayan
hashayas
yohehaya
nosotroshemoshayamos

The subjunctive present-tense forms of verbs following the blue pattern (whose infinitive ending is "-ar") are always regular, even when there is an irregular indicative present-tense form ("doy" and "estoy").

INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW


MATCH IT - SINGULAR

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

MATCH IT - ALL FORMS

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

REVIEW FOR MASTERY


SPELL IT - GROUP #1

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - GROUP #2

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - GROUP #3

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT - REVIEW

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching irregular present tense subjunctive mode

verbolocidad subjunctive beta 01


SUBJUNCTIVE MODE OF THE PRESENT

BETA ACTIVITIES

As all regular verbs are formed, the regular forms of the subjunctive mode of the present are formed by taking the regular root and adding the regular ending.

The regular subjunctive forms of the present tense are often described as using the 'opposite' endings.



SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élhablahable
elloshablanhablen
hablashables
yohablohable
nosotroshablamoshablemos


SUBJECTINDICATIVE WAYSUBJUNCTIVE WAY
élcomecoma
elloscomencoman
comescomas
yocomocoma
nosotroscomemoscomamos

Keep in mind that, in Spanish, usually the form to talk about myself is the same as the form to talk about someone else (he or she), and this is true for all the subjunctive forms.

Note that the subjunctive form of "da" and "doy" is "dé", with a written accent to distinguish it visually from the preposition "de". The other subjunctive forms don't have written accents: "den", "des", and "demos".

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

The indicative form of the verb often is found in the subordinate clause, but the opposite isn't true: the subjunctive form of the verb is rarely found in the main clause.

SPELL IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app spelling regular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app spelling regular present tense subjunctive mode

REGULAR FORMS - ROOT FIXES

(I.E., ORTHOGRAPHIC CHANGES)


Verb roots ending in C, G, and Z at times require spelling changes (orthographic changes) to maintain the same sound in all the forms.

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app spelling regular present tense subjunctive mode

SPELL IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app spelling regular present tense subjunctive mode

REGULAR FORMS - ROOT VARIATIONS

(I.E., STEM CHANGES)


For the most part, verbs with root variations (a stressed variation of the root and an unstressed variation) do exactly what you expect.

But if the indicative form "we do" ends with "-imos", there is an extra unstressed root variation that shows up in the subjunctive form that ends with "-amos": dormimos → durmamos.

These are always verbs whose infinitive ends with "-ir".

MATCH IT - ROOT VARIATIONS (I.E., STEM CHANGES)

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular present tense subjunctive mode

course 3 | day 7 | regular | overview of tenses | verbolocidad spanish verbs


COURSE 3 - OVERVIEW OF TENSES - CONTINUED

LESSON 7


NEW VOCABULARY

Notice which verbs have the primary "will" and "would" endings "-irá" and "-iría", because they always use the "-imos" ending in the present. And those that have the secondary variation "-erá" and "-ería" always use "-emos" in the present.

HEAR IT - VERB SET #15 - 00424

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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DIRECT OBJECTS OF THE VERB - CONTINUED

We recommend that you review the Mini Lesson from Day 6.

MATCH IT - VERB SET #15 - 00561

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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FOCUS ON "HAS" - INTRODUCTION

WATCH IT - VIDEO LESSON #10 - ALL THE FORMS OF "HAS"

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MATCH IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #8 & #9 - 00513

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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FIND IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #8 & #9 - 00531

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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Remember that there are 3 subjects in Spanish that mean "you": "tú", "usted", or "ustedes".

Remember that there are 5 direct objects in Spanish that mean "you": "te", "lo", "la", "los", or "las".

Remember that 4 of the 5 objects that mean "you" also express "him", "her", and "them": "lo", "la", "los", or "las".

BUILD IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #14 & #15 - 00500

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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course 3 | day 6 | regular | overview of tenses | verbolocidad spanish verbs


COURSE 3 - OVERVIEW OF TENSES - CONTINUED

LESSON 6


SUBJECT PRONOUNS - CONTINUED

SEE IT - DIVIDING GROUPS - REVIEW (you and I = we, he and she = they, etc.)

intelengua spanish subject pronouns

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NEW VOCABULARY

Notice which verbs have the primary "will" and "would" endings "-irá" and "-iría", because they always use the "-imos" ending in the present. And those that have the secondary variation "-erá" and "-ería" always use "-emos" in the present.

HEAR IT - VERB SET #13 - 00422

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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FOCUS ON "IS/DOES" - CONTINUED

MATCH IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #2 & #13 - 00512

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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FIND IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #2 & #13 - 00530

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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NEW VOCABULARY

HEAR IT - VERB SET #14 - 00423

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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NEW STRUCTURE & VOCABULARY - DIRECT OBJECTS OF THE VERB

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MINI LESSON

DIRECT OBJECTS OF THE VERB - PART 1 OF 2

The subject of the verb does the action, and the object of the verb is part of the action:

(The subject) admires the object.

(He) admires him.

(She) admires her.

(I) admire you.

(They) admire me.

(You) admire us.

(We) admire them.

In Spanish these object pronouns come before the verb:

(Él) me admira.

(Ella) nos admira.

(Yo) lo admiro.

(Nosotros) la admiramos.

In Spanish, the object "you" can be "lo", "la", "los", or "las":

(Yo) lo admiro. = (I) admire you. - talking to a male

(Nosotros) la admiramos. = (We) admire you. - talking to a female

(Ella) los/las admira. = (She) admires you. - talking to a group

In Spanish, the object "you" should be "te" if "lo" and "la" are too formal:

(Yo) te admiro. = (I) admire you. - talking to a male or a female

When the subject and the object are the same person (or thing), the object is called "reflexive":

(He) admires himself.

(She) admires herself.

(They) admire themselves.

(You) admire yourself/yourselves.

(I) admire myself.

(We) admire ourselves.

In Spanish, reflexive objects are more simple than English:

(Él) se admira. = (He) admires self.

(Ella) se admira. = (She) admires self.

(Ellos/Ellas) se admiran. = (They) admire self.

(Usted) se admira. = (You) admire self.

(Ustedes) se admiran. = (You) admire self.

But...

(Yo) me admiro. = (I) admire me.

(Nosotros) nos admiramos. = (We) admire us.

(Tú) te admiras. = (You) admire you.

MATCH IT - VERB SET #14 - 00550

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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course 3 | day 5 | regular | overview of tenses | verbolocidad spanish verbs


COURSE 3 - OVERVIEW OF TENSES - CONTINUED

LESSON 5


SUBJECT PRONOUNS - CONTINUED

CLICK-THROUGH LESSON

spanish grammar lesson subject of verb intelengua

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SEE IT - DIVIDING GROUPS - INTRODUCTION (you and I = we, he and she = they, etc.)

intelengua spanish subject pronouns

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FOCUS ON "IS/DOES" - CONTINUED

This VIDEO SNIPPET is an excerpt from VIDEO LESSON #9.

WATCH IT - VIDEO SNIPPET - REVIEW

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MATCH IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #8 & #9 - 00502

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice present tense regular ar er ir

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SEE IT - 00501

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice present tense regular ar er ir

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· If you started the previous version of the program, you can still scroll down to see it, although it won't quite be in sync with the days that have been revised, but it's pretty close.

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TALKING ABOUT MYSELF ALONE: "YO" (CONTINUED)


· Start by reviewing the green pattern.

THE GREEN PATTERN

FROM VERB SET #7 (REVIEW)

unite, absorb,

consume, expend,

divide, part/split

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular ER IR conditional review

TRANSLATE IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR conditional review

THE BLUE PATTERN

· As you start to practice the blue pattern, think about how much of what you know about the green pattern still applies.

FROM VERB SET #2 (REVIEW)

announce, articulate,

exclaim, proclaim,

declare, profess

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular AR conditional introduction

BUILD IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app forming regular AR conditional introduction

FROM VERB SET #5 (REVIEW)

initiate, progress,

endure/last, pause,

cease/stop, terminate/finish

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular AR conditional review

TRANSLATE IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular AR conditional review

course 3 | day 4 | regular | overview of tenses | verbolocidad spanish verbs


COURSE 3 - OVERVIEW OF TENSES - CONTINUED

LESSON 4


REVIEW: FOCUS ON "DID"

Why do the verb forms to say what someone "did" merit extra attention and practice? Because unlike all the other forms, you can't just add the one-letter suffixes "-N" and "-S"!

SEE IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #1 & #4 - 00430

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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BASIC SUBJECT PRONOUNS: TALKING ABOUT MYSELF

When I talk about myself alone, I say "I". And when I talk about myself in a group, I say "we", or anything that adds up to "we", such as "he and I", "my friends and I", or "you and I".

PERSONAL-PRONOUN TRANSLATOR - SUBJECTS

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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SEE IT - PERSONAL PRONOUNS (SUBJECTS)

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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WATCH IT - VIDEO LESSON #9 - ALL THE FORMS OF THE PRESENT (AND A SECRET ABOUT THE PAST)

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MATCH IT - BLUE & GREEN - VERB SETS #1 & #4 - 00501

In this group of verbs, you'll see why "-imos" is considered the primary pattern, and "-emos" is considered the secondary variation.

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular ER IR past perfect pluperfect introduction

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COURSE 3 - TALKING ABOUT MYSELF

LESSON 1

· You understand how to talk about others, whether you're talking about one person or more, and you understand the basic ways to say "you" in Spanish ("usted", "ustedes", and "tú").

· This week you'll learn how to talk about yourself: first talking about yourself alone ("I"), then yourself as part of a group ("we").

VIDEO LESSON #6

TALKING ABOUT MYSELF ALONE: "YO"


WATCH IT

TALKING ABOUT MYSELF ALONE: "YO"


· Today you'll only practice the green pattern.

FROM VERB SET #1 (REVIEW)

debate, discuss,

decide, define,

summarize, allude

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app matching regular conditional introduction

BUILD IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app forming regular conditional introduction

TRANSLATE IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular conditional introduction

FROM VERB SET #9 (REVIEW)

repress, oppress/press,

inhibit, expel,

interrupt, suspend

BUILD IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app forming regular conditional

MATCH IT

intelengua spanish verb conjugation practice app translating regular conditional